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in education today. you are one of the sponsors, the national education association, of this incredible summit meeting. tell the folks watching now a little better about the who, what, when, where, why. >> we started an idea in a meeting with secretary duncan, what if we brought together the leaders, the ministers from the country's redoing an international assessment, and we did not dream it would come about to the extent it has. last year was such a positive experience from everyone. as i talked to fellow union presidents from around the world, their reaction was so positive. they went out to dinner together, had informal conversations, in addition to -- they said, "i spent more time with the minister of education than i did in three months, six months." the level of conversation really did what we know happens when you want collaboration. you have got to sit down and build those relationships. the big winners are students in education. >> so getting people to sit and talk with each other? >> yes, it is really important. if the minister of education and union president have such a poor relat
in education today. thank you for sitting with us. >> happy to be here. >> there was a summit last year. at the end of the summit they published a paper that had four -- 5 points. at the end, it came around teaching and it had to do with teacher evaluations. >> this is hard. we were talking about this this morning. the conversation is going on around the world, which is exciting, particularly for the united states. before i get your answer, we have to praise this administration for getting involved on in the -- involved in the international conversation. we have never done that before. we are part of that conversation, which i think is very positive for us. so, a teacher evaluation. every teacher knows they make a difference in how a child learns. they would not come to work if they did not believe that. the challenge is, how do you assess what they are achieving with kids? what everybody objects to within the profession is you cannot tell if you're doing a good job based on the score on a single test. what a child does on a single test, on a single day does not do justice to the child'
an archive of a disappearing world? >> the education system that is a national machine turning up highly motivated students, what happens if a child does not fit the stereotype? our correspondent has been taking a look at a very different side of south korean education. >> to be successful in south korea, students need a obedience, discipline, and an insatiable appetite for study. at this alternative high school, success is measured slightly differently, in happiness. here the curriculum offers board games as well as mathematics. if you would never give away with this in a normal korean school. this is where they come when they fall off of the education conveyor belt. the teaching here is everything the traditional schooling is not. a would-be chefs with a troubled past. >> there were too many regulations of my old school. i had trouble sticking to them and i got angry. i used to bully and fight with other kids. that my parents got angry, so i ran away from home and i would get into other bad things. >> here he says the teachers are not only more relaxed, but crucially they teach at the
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
are losing their jobs, homes, decent wages, affordable health care and higher education. our civil liberties are under attack. the wealthy few are making out better than ever. >> this is also about whether our nation continues down the road toward totalitarianism. >> sound unfamiliar? as president obama and mitt romney squared off for the first time, we break the sound barrier by expanding the debate in real time to include two candidates shut out of the major political parties. the green party's jill stein and the justice party's rocky anderson. expanding the debate. this is what democracy sounds like. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are on the road in denver, colorado. president obama and republican challenger mitt romney squared off in denver wednesday night in the first of three presidential campaigns. drilling obama in the polls of several battleground states, romney sought to rejuvenate his campaign with an attack on what he called president obama's policies of trickle-down government. >> i am con
. we need more investment in skills and education. the irony, of course is that what romney proposes, or tax cuts for the rich, slashing government, slashing help for precisely those who need it, slashing government's role in infrastructure, in science and technology, would take us so far away from what we need, i wish president obama had the revenues to do more, but it is the republican side that is blocking that because that party has one idea only. and that is to cut taxes for the rich. we have this multi-brazilian there running for office. his money is in the cayman island. he pays 13% in taxes. he says the most important thing is to cut the tax rates at the top for the. it is mind-boggling that we have this kind of blatant candidacy. people are hurting, people are upset. that is why this weirdness even has a choice. but it would take as exactly in the wrong direction. president obama could have done more and would have done more if the republican opposition had not blocked the end of the bush era tax cuts for the rich, for example. so romney is in quite a position to be blaming
opportunities in the millions of chinese students eager for a foreign education. nhk world reports. >> translator: it is the first time these institutions more than 40 of them have held a joint seminar. >> translator: i want to enroll in a prestigious american university because the quality is high. >> potential is ver hiy high especially for undergraduate students. this is one of the main goals is to recruit more undergraduate students. >> many chinese student are keen on studying at foreign universities. and if they can't, make it overseas to study, overseas universities are coming to them. for example, the missouri state university, a u.s. institution, provides classes on the campus of a university in china. all classes are in english. at what temperature does water freeze? what would you tell me? chinese students earn the same degrees as the university students in the u.s. more than 2,000 chinese have graduated from here. since classes started six years ago. she hopes to join them. she is a senior, studying business administration, and accounting. li comes from inland china and
have an aging population, but they also have huge problems with their youth, the pressures on education, health and so on for young people. this is a major challenge for the developing countries. some of them have begun to address it. this is one of those issues that creeps up on you, like climate change. government pushes it into the next session of parliament, if you like, but by 26 feet there will be more people over the age of 60 than under the age of 16. in bolivia they now have an old age pension of about $50 per month, per person, which is beginning to improve matters. >> there are other kinds of things that these producers are talking about. >> it really affects every area of social policy. it is about health, it is about housing and long-term educating people to make themselves healthier so that they do not represent a drain on the state as they get older. it is about the opportunities and challenges. older people, with their experience and education, if they live longer and work longer, they can contribute. >> does your report give any sense as to what might happen if these me
consider it a craft. i am easily over educated for what i do. but it did instill in me a sense of pride for the craft of acting and storytelling, holding up a mirror to people and entertaining people and making them laugh and improving their lives. i wanted to do that at a level where i was not just responsible for the role. going into "the hunger games" tomorrow. i am only responsible for playing the role to the best of my ability. it is very gratifying to be with a project from the seed, from that book proposal across the desk, seeing the project in my mind's eye, finding the great collaborators, finding the writer to write it, finding a great director to directed, giving the actors and jobs. to be able to say yes to other people is a great feeling, really gratifying, amazing feeling. tavis: what, to your mind, made "the hunger games" work so well? >> did you read the book? those books captured everything for me. i can -- i think katniss is truly a modern heroine. she has an amazing moral compass. she also gets to fall in love. she gets to win and triumphed and take an entire nation w
. it says that 1 billion pounds was spent on educating children in three african countries. there has been no improvement whatsoever in literacy. it is all about meeting targets, not achieving anything. that is the biggest problem. i would not object if it was going to do something. >> really? >> i have no problem. but it is corrosive. it is corroding the connection between governments and people. a lot of the money and workers say it does not work. forget for all the talk we hear about education, $1.3 billion helps to clean up turkey and improve things and iceland. this is where the money is going. they do not know what to do with the money. a lot of consultants are getting rich on the back of this. >> no development aid goes to iceland. that money is about exception to the european union. that is the kind of misunderstanding. it does not come out of the aid budget. but a fight in -- >> 500 million last year paid consultants. many of them grow straight into the pockets of the people who run them. >> absolutely right. she looks at exactly where the money goes. it does worry us. absolutely.
to get to advance women and women making advancements in college education, in even doctors biology, chemistry, education. you're still seeing this bias in the sciences. are we ever going to overcome it? >> interestingly enough it turns out at yale, they have some of the higher numbers for women in the stem program. 39-46% of their women or of their students in that program are female and i think last year they had around 40 something percent graduation rate where the national average is 38%. what bothers or concerns me with this is some of this is still unfortunately, biased and prejudices. both from men and women. and that's really human nature and how do we get beyond that? because i think part of it, you see with the study that some women graded men higher and that's because they thought the guy was really more qualified or are you afraid you might lose your position? on the other side of that coin is where men, the bias is that do you want to keep an old boy's network or open up for women? so the other thing that i think we are working on but need to work hard ser to encourage
, education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: we continue this evening with matt damon and gary white, they are cofounders of water.org. >> and i heard these statistics that were jaw dropping about a child dying every 20 seconds because of lack of access to clean water and sanitation, that is, that to me is just staggering, because -- because to relate to that as an american, i mean, we don't know people who are thirsty, it just doesn't happen, right? you know, with away don't know kid who die from diarrhea. >> rose: water is ubiquitous. >> yes, of course, or cholera for that matter, just clean water. so, you know, so that was one side of it, just the mindless death and bono talks about stupid death, you know, because it is preventable. >> we have known how to make water safe for more than 100 years, right? imagine we discovered the cure for aids today, and 100 years from now 3.5 million people are still dying becau
. despite the huge investment in their education, almost half of recent university graduates are either unemployed or underemployed and many worry about the future. which candidate will they support? our correspondent has this report from philadelphia. >> mack has just qualified as a lawyer, so now taken put his lawbooks away and turn his attention to is $170,000 student debt. >> the whole gravity of it really did not hit me until about a few months ago when all of a sudden it was like, that's not just a number, that is actually a representative of something. so the joke has always been, well, i bought a house. but really it is a little bit more than that. unable to find a job, he's moving to texas to live with his parents and is not thrilled about it. >> i am 27 years old. even though it is rather typical of people, it is still not culturally normative. >> americans of $1 trillion in student loans and they are struggling to find work -- owe $1 trillion. at temple university, students appear being trapped in low- paying jobs. >> i hope for the best, but i know from previous experience,
to artificially create a human being. the japanese education minister allows researchers to create ova and sperm using ips cells. but it bans fertilization of these cells. >> those research pose serious ethical questions as well there? >> yes, let's listen to how bioethics expert views this issue. >> researchers have so far refrained from fertilizing ips cells because such an act would be problematic. an increasing number of, obstetricians, treating couples are raising questions about the ban. demanding the latest technology be made available to treat their patients. the line should be drawn to clarify to what extent the latest technology can be used to treat infertility. >> i think the debate should start as soon as possible in view of the rapid progress into being made into ips cell research. the issue does not only concern scientist thousands, i think everyone in japan must be involved in effort to find the right direction by carefully weighing the merits and demerits. >> right. thank you very much there. >>> offices with japan maritime self defense force have spotted chinese naval ships in i
and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized, individual and group retirement products. that's why we're you're your retirement company. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernathy. good to have you with us. aas p as protests continued debates were front and center at the opening session of the united nations general assembly in new york. in a strong speech, president obama again condemned the video as an insult to muslims and all americans, but america rejects it. >> given the power and faith and passion that it can inflame, the strongest weapon is not repression, it's more speech. the voices of tolerance that rally against bigotry and lift up the values of understanding and mumpl respect. >> he called on world leaders to speak out forcefully against extremism. >> na brand of politics that pits east against west and south against north and muslims against christians and hindus and jews can't deliver on the promise of freedom. >> many arab and muslim leaders renewed their can calls for a u.n. resolution to banal defamation of religion. egypt's new president morsi
been started. >> translator: we will provide even more support by educating young ambitious people at places like this. and nurturing global competitiveness. >> reporter: one of the self-employed people the center helps. and it's backing has paid off. chen and three friend launched this shop last week. the center provides $600 of funding a month. chen majored in journalism and graduated from university last february. his job search got him nowhere. later, he decided to start a business of his own. but first, he researched by spending six muchths wo mun -- months working for franchise restaurants. i figured if i fail, i can try something else. after all, i am young. time is on my side. that's why i decided to start a business. >> chen and his partners are trying to attract customers. every morning they sell the rice bowl to university students on the street. not only do they make sales, but it is also a good way to promote their brand. >>> one rice bowl costs $1. rice bowls, are all hand made just before serving. >> translator: it looks new fresh us and good for my health. convenien
wanted a free education. >> the bbc found former pupils who described what their former head master did to him. >> he hit me with a stick and other times with his hands. he used to beat us every sunday then take photos and then offer chocolate. he would rub you afterwards and say nothing had happened. >> eight of the indian boys are now suing slade's former friend and one-time business partner, derek sawyer, a previous leader in london and lord mayor of lessor whose charity funded the employment of slade. the boys' lawyer announced the case against them at the press conference alleging they failed to protect people from slade's sexual abuse. >> you owe an obligation to those in the school to look after them and safe and free from harm. and if something unimportant to happens, such as being abused by a teacher, then those who are responsible in english law are then accountable. >> derek slade is now in prison. those being sued have distanced themselves from them saying they were shocked to discover he was a danger to children. emily buchanan, bbc news. >> still to come on gmt, vatican po
to solve his problems with hispanic voters. he didn't solve that problem. his problem with educated women voters. those issues didn't come up in this debate, he didn't solve any problems with those people. you think about just in terms of the battle ground states, there's going to be a tightening, we're seeing a tightening already. but the obama people, we have a swing state possible this morning from nbc and "wall street journal" president obama ahead by 8 points in ohio. it remains the case tomorrow as it was earlier today that president obama, i don't see how, maybe that poll tightens a little bit but that's still a massive problem for mitt romney. how you win the presidency as a republican without ohio which has never happened in the history of the republic. this was an important debate and mitt romney did himself a lot of good but the one thing the obama taking comfort in they are still looking at those problems he has with specific voter groups that give president obama an advantage in the battle ground states and will continue to give him an advantage in terms of how to get to 270
the strategy to train and educate afghan security forces. there's no train-- attempt at strategy. >> rose: when the french going out? >> well, some of them have left already. some of the combat troops. but i have to add the french stay committed. they continue to contribute in different ways. among other things they contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan. >> rose: but combat soldiers will be leaving by the end of 2013? >> actually by the end of this year. so they are in the process now of withdrawing but they still contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan so they stay committed until the end of 2014. >> rose: it's a presence but not a combat presence then. >> the same goes for the coalition partners. we have different tasks within and some people contribute trainers, others contribute combat troops. >> rose: okay. at the beginning of 2014 how many nations will do you think will be contributing combat troops? >> we don't know yet because that will very much depend on the security situation on the ground. >> rose: so it may not leave before 2014 if the situat
, and it is about efficiency. >> and market education? >> it can be, look for example, in retrospect, it is obvious, the banks need a higher capital assets. >> right. >> that requires regulation. >> and higher capital requirements? >> yes, they did. and the systemic risks were far too buying and you need to regulate properly to do that and in the uk we are trying to get a greater separation between the retail side of banking and the investment side of banking. so look, the lesson of 2008, market reform is essential, under regulated markets have a tendency to crash. but let's not think that somehow that means that an old-fashioned state is going to be the answer. i mean, let's give you an example which may be to american eyes is challenging. we have a national health service. >> right. >> which. >> we had one for a while. >> >> tax funded, universal service for all britains use it. we know we need to reform that, we need to reform it so that we get much greater responsibility of citizens as well as clinicians because we know that in diabetes or asthma self management -- >> what is wrong with it in i
and male? not to mention those in between. to work at keeping the entire community fed, educated and safe? democratic womanism, democratic socialist womanism, would have as its icons such fierce warriors for good as vandana shiva aung san suu kyi, wangari maathai harriet tubman yoko ono frida kahlo angela davis & barbara lee: with new ones always rising, wherever you look. recent writers for instance: you're also on this list that it must up or be unable to finish. just know i've stood you in a circle that includes happy to be surrounded. there is no system, there is no system now in place that can change the disastrous course the earth is on. who can doubt this? the male leaders of earth appear to have abandoned the most appear to live now entirely in their heads. they murder humans and other animals forests and rivers and mountains every day they are in office and never seem to notice it. they eat and drink devastation. women of the world, is this devastation us? what we kill whole continents for oil or anything else rather than limit the number of consumer offspring we produce and lear
to college to get an education. it is a safe place. statistically, one of the safest places you can be. there is a mentality that carrying a weapon should be an everyday occurrence, when you get ready to go to class, to dinner, you pick up your wallet, your books, and you're gone. it is just absurd. -- your gun. >> colorado announced that students carrying guns would be allowed to keep weapons in a limited number of housing units. this is how one person reacted to the news. >> it is sort of a policy of separate but equal. if you want to exercise your second amendment rights, you have to live in a segregated dorm essentially. it is probably going to be the safest dorm on campus. i know a lot of people who do not have carried and conceal permits asking to live in that door, because they know it is not going to get robbed, criminals will not target it. >> noah molotch? >> family housing here is housing for students of the university who have families. if i had a family as a student, i would be rather appalled that everyone with a gun will be placed next door to me. i do not agree that tha
, they are obviously well educated people with a kind of refinement about them, they aren't sloppy in any way, obnoxious in any way, they use firm language but both basically strong people, in the accomplishment, it was probably a very good pick but the romney that came in last night i would say you were right a couple of minutes ago, that romney was not predictable, he came in so strong and so in charge that he basically took over the room and i felt he was sufficient on that stage meaning the president didn't need to be on there for romney to put on the show or jim lehrer, it was romney control of that space and physical control of that space which was so dominant, i don't think we have seen anything like it before. >> rose:. >> in probably a presidential debate. >> rose: i also heard this was not a new romney in the context of have i seen him before. >> yes, mike barnicle saw him in the race for governor when he did win that against shannon o'brien and he has put on that performance but i moderated one of the debates the last time time around at the reagan library, he was good but wasn't
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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